Spoiled Children of Divorce


Newsweek Article
April 17, 2008, 5:40 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

Newsweek is featuring an article on Children of D. this week. Writer David J. Jefferson has written “The Divorce Generation Grows Up.” Jefferson returned to his High School and interviewed some of his classmates to find out how their parent’s Divorces impacted their lives.  Nice to see this subject getting some attention.

http://www.newsweek.com/id/131838

from the article:

It’s been more than a quarter century since the Grant High class of ’82 donned tuxes and taffeta and danced to Styx’s “Come Sail Away” at the senior prom, and nearly four decades have passed since no-fault divorce laws began spreading across the country. In our parents’ generation, marriage was still the most powerful social force. In ours, it was divorce. My 44-year-old classmates and I have watched divorce morph from something shocking, even shameful, into a routine fact of American life.

But while it may be a common occurrence, divorce remains a profound experience for those who’ve lived through it. Researchers have churned out all sorts of depressing statistics about the impact of divorce. Each year, about 1 million children watch their parents split, triple the number in the ’50s. These children are twice as likely as their peers to get divorced themselves and more likely to have mental-health problems, studies show. While divorce rates have been dropping—off from their 1981 peak to just 3.6 per 1,000 people in 2006—marriage has also declined sharply, falling to 7.3 per 1,000 people in 2006 from 10.6 in 1970. Sociologists decry a growing “marriage gap” in which the well educated and better paid are staying married, while the poor are still getting divorced (people with college degrees are half as likely to be divorced or separated as their less-educated peers). And the younger you marry, the more likely you are to get divorced.

Yet all these statistics fail to show the very personal impact of divorce on the individual, or how those effects can change over a lifetime as children of divorce start families of their own. When we were growing up, divorce loomed as the ultimate threat to innocence, but what were my peers’ feelings about it now that they were adults? What I wanted to know was how divorce had affected our class president and Miss Congeniality, the stoners and the valedictorian. Did it leave them with emotional scars that never healed, or did they go on to lead “normal” lives? Did they wind up in divorce court, or did they achieve the domestic bliss their parents had sought in suburbia? I decided to open my yearbook, pick up the phone and find out. These are their stories—or at least their side of their stories, since each breakup is perceived so differently by every family member.


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